Monday, September 11, 2017

UPDATED: Council OKs demo to make way for construction of new apartment building on Locust Street

Columbia might be getting a new 33-unit apartment building in the downtown. Way downtown - at the corner of Locust Street and Bank Avenue.

Borough Council approved an application from Brian & Benjamin Myers Monday night for demolition at 128-132 Locust Street and 45 Bank Avenue to allow for new construction of a new four-story mixed-use apartment building at the site. The Historic Architectural Review Board (HARB) initially green-lighted the project at its August 16 meeting by approving "Certificates of Appropriateness" for demolition and new construction. 

The building will include ground-level retail spaces, enclosed parking, brick veneer and metal siding wall treatment, and storefront awnings and upper-level balconies, according to the submitted architectural plans and materials.

The issue must now go before the planning commission at its meeting next Monday.


This existing building at Locust Street and Bank Avenue is slated for demolition.

The building contains several units, at least one of which is currently occupied.

Mobile home on Bank Avenue to be demolished, currently occupied

Aerial view of 128-132 Locust Street and 45 Bank Avenue

Old design and revised design

Bank Avenue

Locust Street side

 Corner of Locust Street and Bank Avenue

Bank Avenue and rear of building


26 comments:

  1. More section 8 housing,just what we need. You all know thats whats coming.

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  2. Not likely. What people refer to as "section 8 housing" does not exist. Any rental structure meeting the stipulations can be considered a property that accepts Section 8 Program (also known as the Housing Choice Voucher Program) can qualify.

    At this time there are no vouchers available in Lancaster County.

    Become more familiar with the program here: http://www.lcha.ws/section8.php

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  3. Will this be fixed income housing like Trinity House?

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  4. It's a nice building, hope they have the available parking for all 33 apartments. That equates to 66 parking spaces!! (2 spaces for each unit according to rental code) Looks like it will be a congested area in the future.

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    Replies
    1. they dont need them! All the other apartments dont, why should them!

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  5. How soon are they going to start building this apt

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    Replies
    1. There's been no notification of a start date yet.

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  6. Regarding the rental units and parking requirements:

    At a recent zoning meeting a borough resident that was selling a two unit building had to comply with off street parking requirements. She already has two off street spaces, but the board wanted to see two more off street spaces made available.

    There's an apartment house in my block with at least four units and PLENTY of room for off street parking yet they provide none. Renters and their guests take spaces on the street. This rental house has a very large flat yard that is easily accessible from the back alley. The yard is never used for any reason.

    No wonder residents get angry about the code department. Nothing is dealt out evenly.

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    Replies
    1. The Zoning Board is not required to deal things out evenly. There are many factors in every decision. Factors that never even meet the eye. They are the powers that be. That's the way it is everywhere. Like it or not.

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  7. Who is funding it ?, Columbia Borough ??

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  8. thought the boro was not in the real estate business???? HA! bet me!

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    Replies
    1. only when it is for for the betterment of the down town

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  9. To dispell rumors and assumptions, please see below:

    1. This is not Section #8. The apartments will be targeted to young professionals and will be available for rent to professionals, etc. This is NOT public housing.

    2. The existing buildings were purchased privately by the company, which is building the apartment building. NO borough funds were utilized.

    3. The company has made arrangements to provide its own parking. They will be renting some spots in the borough lot for a substantial fee, which is PAID TO the borough. The owner WILL PAY the borough. There will be remaining ample parking.

    4. This building is part of the downtown revitalization to bring in younger professionals and others to settle in Columbia.

    5. There will be good security.

    6. There will be retail space on the first floor. On the upper floors, there will be one bedroom and one bedroom and a den apartments.

    The commenters need to go to Borough meetings as opposed to relying on rumors and assumptions. This apartment building will be an asset to Columbia. All residents wants to improve downtown Columbia. Let's unite to make it happen!

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    Replies
    1. If you want to attract young professionals to columbia - you have to improve the school district. Period.

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    2. can you further define what exactly a "young professional" is ? Is this a term that is defined in the Columbia Ordinance ??

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    3. Was the historical background done on this property? Seems like HARB rushed this through quickly. Was the Historic Preservation Society contacted? What if there was Underground Railroad activity inside this structure.
      I asked Chris Vera who owned this property in the 1800's and he told me the Barber family.
      They should have to do an analysis on this home.

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  10. Being one bedroom apartments, I assume there will be a low number of children.
    I hope they are affordable and maintained.
    Best wishes.

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  11. Young professionals are working people of the millennial generation. This style of apartment living appeals to them. Usually, they are single or married couples who have no children. The apartments can be rented by other people, as well. "Younger professionals" is a marketing term only. It is not used in a legal sense, thus it is not defined in the Columbia Borough Ordinances.

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    Replies
    1. Very few want to live in a single-bedroom apartment in some little drug-ridden downtown. Don't confuse what people want with what they are forced to do. Apartment living doesn't "appeal" to millenials. It's that they are so far in debt they can't afford the down payment on a house.

      I get it, you are promoting this thing - but let's be realistic. We're not all idiots here.

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  12. So, the young professionals will be looking at the LazyK. I'm sure they'll be thrilled to pay for that.

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  13. The "young professionals" will be thrilled with the Susquehanna river views.

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  14. And the roaring of the trains.

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  15. It's a catch 22. Young Professionals will come if the rents cheaper than Lancaster city BUT than the cheap rent brings in lower income "professionals". One or two bad people that are hard to evict will drove out the intended tenants, resulting in another high density low income apartment building.

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  16. It's a joke - who would want to live along a trash route next to a train track with a public parking lot in the front yard and 200 low income apartments in the back yard ? Maybe old deaf and blind people with subsidized rents

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  17. Nice point,, until your last sentence.

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  18. Nothing against old deaf and blind people - as i'm getting to be one myself ! - and if they subsidize my rent I would probably be willing to live there so I can hear the trains.

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